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Quick Tips: How to Beat the Flu this Season

February 2, 2018

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Flu season is here, complete with all the aches and pains, runny noses, fevers and sick days that make this time of year unbearable. While we try our best to avoid the flu, the best defense is a good offense. Here are some things you should know to help you fight the flu this season:

    • Make it a priority to get your flu shot
      The CDC recommends everyone six months and older get an annual flu shot as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses. Since flu viruses are constantly changing, vaccines are updated annually to keep up. With each new flu season, you need a new flu shot.
    • Young man happily washing hands in public school restroomStop the spread of germs by washing hands frequently, and cover your cough or sneeze
      Flu viruses are thought to spread mainly from person to person through droplets made when people with a flu cough, sneeze or talk. Flu viruses also may spread when people touch something with flu virus on it, and then touch their mouth, eyes or nose. In short, remember what your mother told you: Cover your cough, and wash those hands!
    • Disinfect hard surfaces
      In school, at work, and at home, oftentimes cleanliness leads to better health. Routinely sanitizing high-traffic areas can help you avoid the flu and other germs.
    • Stay hydrated
      Studies show that staying hydrated may boost your immune system, enabling your body to better fight viruses. To fight the flu, drink lots fluids, especially water, but avoid caffeinated drinks.
  • When in doubt, call your doctor
    In general, flu symptoms are much worse than the common cold, and, if left untreated, the flu can result in serious problems such as pneumonia, bacterial infections or worse. If you’re feeling ill and your symptoms are severe, take the time to visit your doctor.

Need help staying healthy this season? Contact the GGC Office of Wellness Programming.